Question: 6 Photosynthesis and the Chloroplast CASE STUDY: Can Plants Get Cancer? As summer approaches thin…


6 Photosynthesis and the Chloroplast CASE STUDY: Can Plants Get Cancer? As summer approaches think about all of the sunscreen that appears in stores, the ads in magazines and on TV, and the consistent reminder to protect you from the sun. Why? Because you want to ensure that you dont get skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, accounting for approximately 50% of cancers, skin cancer can be caused by damage from ultraviolet light. This high- energy light can directly cause DNA damage in exposed cells. The American Cancer Society estimates approximately a million cases or more of skin cancer will be diagnosed each year. That exceeds the population of San Jose, CA, which is the 10th largest city in the Us. In contrast to human beings, plants require the suns light and energy for their existence. Why is it that plants dont get cancer when they spend their days in the sun without first slathering themselves with sunscreen? The reason is that plant tissues contain a number of pigments that can capture the suns energy and release unused energy in a controlled manner. Pigments like chlorophylls (which are green) are used in photosynthesis. Accessory pigments like carotenoids (which are yellow, red or orange) help to protect the plant cells from solar radiation. At noon, both chlorophylls and carotenoids work in concert to harvest solar energy while protecting the plant from DNA damage. Humans created solar protective pigments as well, like the melanin in your suntanned skin, but plants have evolved into solar experts due to the process of photosynthesis. Plants can get cancer, just not from the sun. Tumors may form due to bacterial, viral or fungal infections. lonizing radiation can cause DNA damage, as well. Even high-intensity sunlight can cause the formation of thymine dimers, just as it does in our skin cells. Plants are just less likely to form tumors than animals Questions.
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6 Photosynthesis and the Chloroplast CASE STUDY: Can Plants Get Cancer? As summer approaches think about all of the sunscreen that appears in stores, the ads in magazines and on TV, and the consistent reminder to protect you from the sun. Why? Because you want to ensure that you don't get skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, accounting for approximately 50% of cancers, skin cancer can be caused by damage from ultraviolet light. This high- energy light can directly cause DNA damage in exposed cells. The American Cancer Society estimates approximately a million cases or more of skin cancer will be diagnosed each year. That exceeds the population of San Jose, CA, which is the 10th largest city in the Us. In contrast to human beings, plants require the sun's light and energy for their existence. Why is it that plants don't get cancer when they spend their days in the sun without first slathering themselves with sunscreen? The reason is that plant tissues contain a number of pigments that can capture the sun's energy and release unused energy in a controlled manner. Pigments like chlorophylls (which are green) are used in photosynthesis. Accessory pigments like carotenoids (which are yellow, red or orange) help to protect the plant cells from solar radiation. At noon, both chlorophylls and carotenoids work in concert to harvest solar energy while protecting the plant from DNA damage. Humans created solar protective pigments as well, like the melanin in your suntanned skin, but plants have evolved into solar experts due to the process of photosynthesis. Plants can get cancer, just not from the sun. Tumors may form due to bacterial, viral or fungal infections. lonizing radiation can cause DNA damage, as well. Even high-intensity sunlight can cause the formation of thymine dimers, just as it does in our skin cells. Plants are just less likely to form tumors than animals Questions.

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